HDTV FAQs

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HDTV FAQ

What is HDTV?

How do I get HDTV?

Is there really a noticeable difference between HDTV and regular TV?

What is aspect ratio?

What is screen resolution?

How do I know which picture format to use?

What does component video mean?

What does YPbPr mean?

What does RGB mean?

What does DVI mean? What is HDCP? What is HDMI?

What does it take to launch HDTV in my house?

Does HDTV cost extra?

How many high definition stations can I get with Time Warner Cable HDTV?

What shows can I get in high definition with Time Warner Cable?

How do I set up my converter?

 

What is HDTV?

HDTV stands for high-definition television, with the emphasis on high definition. Currently your television is receiving an analog signal. In analog TV, a 6 MHz signal produces 500 horizontal pixels (dots). These pixels comprise the picture you see on your screen. HDTV can have a resolution of up to 1920 by 1080 pixels, or more than two million pixels. That's more than six times the detail of regular television.

How do I get HDTV?

Once you have a high-definition television, you can access HDTV programming by calling us at 643-2337 or by going online to upgrade your cable set-top box to an HD-enabled set-top box.

Is there really a noticeable difference between HDTV and regular TV?

Yes. HDTV is the ultimate home entertainment experience. HDTV allows you to experience more of the TV picture with a wider viewing area, life-like picture quality, and the depth and clarity of true Dolby surround sound. It's like having a movie theater experience in your home.

Digital Cable is a type of television signal. HDTV is the highest quality in digital signals, offering better resolution and sound than a standard digital signal. Digital Cable can be watched on your existing standard television if you have one of our digital set-top boxes. Digital Cable can also be watched in high-definition if you have an HDTV television and you have an HD-compatible digital set-top box.

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What is aspect ratio?

An aspect ratio is the ratio of the width to the height of the TV screen. The aspect ratios differ because the television industry manufactures both standard-screen and wide-screen HDTV's to appeal to consumer viewing preferences.

A standard screen HDTV has a 4:3 aspect ratio. The screen is 4 units wide for every 3 units tall. A wide-screen HDTV is one-third wider than a standard-screen HDTV. The screen is 16 units wide for every 9 units tall.

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What is screen resolution?

The screen resolution indicates the amount of detail that the picture displays. Resolution is identified by the number of display lines on the screen. The techniques that an HDTV uses to "paint" the picture on the screen are referred to as progressive and interlaced.

For example, a resolution of 1080i indicates that the screen shows 1080 lines in an interlaced display, and 480p means that the screen shows 480 lines in a progressive display.
Note: The screen resolution (1080i, 480p, etc.) is sometimes referred to as the scan rate. The terms are interchangeable.

With the progressive method (top photo), every pixel on the screen is refreshed simultaneously, whereby the interlaced method (bottom photo) involves refreshing pixels in alternation - first the odd lines and then the even lines.

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How do I know which picture format to use?

The type of screen your HDTV has determines how the set-top displays programs on the screen. The following examples show how programs will look when the picture format is set to Normal mode (not Stretch or Zoom modes).

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What does component video mean?

It means that video is represented as three different components which may be combined in an HDTV to provide video. There are different component video formats such as YPbPr and RGB.

What does YPbPr mean?

YPbPr is the component video format in which the luminance (Y) is represented separately from the color components (Pb and Pr). The majority of HDTV's today support this format. The Y output on HDTV's and HDTV receivers is provided as a Green jack, the Pb is provided as a Blue jack, and the Pr is provided as a Red jack. The colors themselves are not to be confused as an RGB output.

The Explorer 3100HD has a YPbPr output only.

What does RGB mean?

RGB is the component format in which the primary TV monitor colors (red, green and blue) are transmitted as three independent components. Some older HDTV monitors have only RGB inputs. If you have one of these HDTV's you need an RGB adapter.

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What does DVI mean? What is HDCP? What is HDMI?

DVI stands for Digital Visual Interface. DVI is an all digital link between a video/audio source such as an HDTV settop and a display device such as an HDTV. The DVI link provides an uncompressed digital stream. The DVI link does not contain audio, so audio is still needed to be connected from the settop to the HDTV or home theatre system. One advantage of DVI is that the link allows graphics to be sent along the link as well. This allows the user interface from the settop to be displayed on the HDTV.

The DVI 1.0 connector on the settop and HDTV looks as follows:

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HDCP stands for High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection. HDCP is the copy protection standard that is tied to DVI.

HDMI is the next generation of DVI. HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface. The main difference between HDMI and DVI 1.0 is that HDMI adds audio to the DVI link and is a smaller connector. The HDMI interface will be backwards compatible to the DVI 1.0 interface, meaning that you can connect up a set-top to an HDTV, where one has DVI 1.0 and the other has HDMI. HDMI became available in most HDTV's in 2004. Most new HDTV's have HDMI. Those that don't most likely are equipped with DVI, which is backwards compatible.

The HDMI connector on the settop looks as follows:

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What does it take to launch HDTV in my house?

You need three things: a High Definition Television, an HDTV-compatible cable box and to be a Time Warner Cable subscriber.

HDTV sets are available at major electronics retailers. "High Definition Television Monitors" do not come with a HD tuner, but that's OK because the Time Warner Cable HD-enabled box comes with one built in.

Time Warner Cable customers with an HDTV but no HD converter can pick up an HD-enabled converter box at any of our Cable Store locations, just call 643-2337 or go online to set up an appointment.

Does HDTV cost extra?

The television itself is more expensive than most standard televisions. Otherwise, there's very little extra. The Time Warner Cable HD converter costs no more than our digital cable converter. There is a $6.95/month fee for the HD Tier, which includes HD NBC Sports Network, HD ESPN, HD ESPN 2, HD FSN, HD National Geographic, Mojo, HD Net Movies, HD Universal, & HD Showcase On Demand. Other HD channels, including ABC, PBS, NBC, FOX, TNT, Discovery HD Theatre, HBO, Showtime, and more come at no extra charge, though to receive HBO HD and/or Showtime HD, you will need to subscribe to HBO and/or Showtime Premium channels.

How many high definition stations can I get with Time Warner Cable HDTV?

With an HD converter box from Time Warner Cable you will gain access to HD channels including local affiliates for ABC, NBC and PBS plus HBO, Showtime, ESPN, Discovery HD Theater and more. Click here for a complete list of HD Channels.

What shows can I get in high definition with Time Warner Cable?

If you have an HD converter box, you will get all of the high definition shows carried by the channels that we offer. You'll also get special events that are carried by these networks. In the past, these have included the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, the Stanley Cup, the Academy Awards, the NCAA Final Four and the PGA Masters. In addition, you'll get high definition movies and programming from HBO, Showtime and Discovery HD. Our HD Tier carries an additional fee but gives you programming from FSN, National Geographic, Mojo, iNHD1, ESPN, ESPN 2, and more.

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How do I set up my converter?

High Definition Connections

Component Input (PrPbY/V) to an HDTV

Cables Needed:
Component Cables Audio Cables
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Connect Component Cables to the Y Pb Pr ports on the back of the HDTV and HD Converter box. Match the colors that are indicated on the connectors.

Connect Audio Cables to the Audio ports on the back of the HDTV and HD Converter box. Match the colors that are indicated on the connectors

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DVI Connector to an HDTV

Cables Needed:
HDMI to DVI Cable
or
HDMI/DVI Adapter
Audio Cables
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Connect the HDMI Connector to the HDMI Port on the back of the HD Converter Box and the DVI Connector to the DVI port on the back of the HDTV.

Connect Audio Cables to the Audio ports on the back of the HDTV and HD Converter box. Match the colors that are indicated on the connectors.

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HDMI Connector to an HDTV

Cable Needed:
HDMI Cable
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Connect the HDMI Cable to the back of the HD Converter Box and to the HDTV.

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Component Input (PrPbY/V) to a Home Theatre System

Cables Needed:
Component Cables Digital Cable - Dolby Surround Sound
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Connect Component Cables to the Y Pb Pr ports on the back of the HDTV and HD Converter box. Match the colors that are indicated on the connectors.

Connect the Digital Cable - Dolby Surround Sound to the Digital Audio ports on the back of the HDTV and HD Converter box.

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Once your HDTV Converter Box is hooked up, there is one last step to get the best picture possible...the HDTV Setup Wizard.

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